Studies in West Africa said that the vaccines developed by Johnson & Johnson and Merck & Co appear to be safe in children and adults.

Ebola vaccines developed by Johnson & Johnson and Merck & Co produced virus-fighting antibodies and appear to be safe in children and adults, according to two studies conducted in West Africa.

Both companies’ vaccines produced antibodies 14 days after the first of two shots and were detectable at varying levels in both children and adults for one year.

The vaccines are designed to target the Zaire strain of the virus, not the Sudan strain of Ebola that recently caused an outbreak and at least 56 deaths in Uganda.

One regimen tested a dose of Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine, followed by a booster shot of a vaccine from Danish drugmaker Bavarian Nordic,

while another tested two doses of Merck’s vaccine with eight weeks in between. A third option followed the first Merck dose with a placebo.

Only Merck’s shot can potentially be given as a single dose while Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine may need to continue as a two-dose regimen, Lane added.